Norman Hill House, Cam

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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby davegoldsmith » Tue Apr 05, 2011 7:59 pm

No, I can't remember the cottage. Although I used to play in the castle I never went any further, I lived the other end of town. Looking at the last map you posted I noticed you indicated Fred Bailey's house my wife's uncle is Michael Bailey. We did ask him about a month ago if he knew anything about the castle but he could not remember much. Dave
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby Keith McP » Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:45 pm

To fill in some gaps:

Arthur Brend Winterbotham (b. 19 Apr 1838; m. 15 Sep 1963 to Elizabeth Strachan; d. 8 Sep 1892) had three children:
(1) Arthur Strachan Winterbotham (b. 28 Jun 1864; m. 24 Jun 1897 to Ada Caroline Mills; d. 15 Jun 1936).
(2) Emily Page Winterbotham (b. 16 Sep 1865; married Aug 1904 to Hiram Hague; d. 20 Nov 1932).
(3) Herbert Brend Winterbotham (b. 15 Mar 1867; m. 11 Jun 1895 to Blanch Anna Lloyd Owen; d. 11 Aug 1925 at Ashmead near Dursley).

Some other information on Arthur Brend W:

Mr Arthur Brend WINTERBOTHAM, MP, resident of Norman-hill, Dursley, Gloucestershire, was the son of Mr Lindsey Winterbotham, banker, of Stroud and was born in 1838. He was educated at Amersham School and married in 1863 Elizabeth, daughter of Mr Josia Greethead Strachan and Ann Vickers. He voted against the Home Rule bill in 1886, and for a brief period allied himself with the Liberal Unionists in the House of Commons, but subsequently adopted Mr Gladstone's Irish policy. He had sat for the Cirencester Division of Gloucestershire since 1885. His re-election the following year was unopposed, but at the last election, when he was opposed by Colonel Chester-Master, Arthur Brend Winterbotham's majority of 747 in 1885 was reduced to 153. He attended to take the oath at the opening of the new Parliament and appeared to be in his accustomed good health, but a cancerous growth was forming in his throat, and 12 days ago he was removed to London in order that he may undergo an operation at the hands of specialists. This was successfully performed, but he did not regain his strength, and at his own request, he was on 8 Sep 1892, taken home accompanied by the members of his family, his medical attendant and nurses. On his arrival at Stonehouse, the doctors saw that he was sinking rapidly and his coachman was directed to drive as rapidly as possible; Dursley being nine miles away. He reached his house in an unconcious condition and died three hours later. Arthur Winterbotham was a woollen cloth manufacturer and a partner in the firm of Messrs Hunt and Winterbotham of Dursley.

My wife is a relative of Arthur Brend Winterbotham.

Cheers from the Land Down Under
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby Keith McP » Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:58 pm

ken wrote:
> There was a Hiram Hague Winterbotham (born 1 May 1908, died 13 dec 1990)
> who was a manager and a director of the Textile Dept of Dartington Hall Ltd
> and also a director of Dartington Press 1938-1939. More on their website.
> Is this the two year old son on the 1911 census?

The Winterbotham pedigree shows Hiram Hague and Emily Page Winterbotham had two sons:
(1) Arthur Hiram Winterbotham Hague (b. 5 May 1908).
(2) Humphrey John Hague (b. 7 Sep 1909; d. 1973 in Lambeth).

Cheers
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby dursleyglos » Fri Apr 15, 2011 10:02 pm

Welcome to the forum Keith and thanks for the additional family information which completes a few names and dates from what was discussed earlier.

Have you done a lot of research into the Winterbotham family tree?

Andy
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby ken » Tue Apr 19, 2011 6:26 pm

Humphrey John Hague ran, and I believe owned, The Grove Hotel in St. Davids Pembrokeshire. He was certainly there up to the mid 1960's.

Arthur is known to have changed the format of his name at least once.
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby dursleyglos » Wed Apr 20, 2011 9:57 am

I met someone last night who remembers seeing Arthur Strachan Winterbotham and his wife Ada when they lived at Stonehouse Court. He recalls the way they travelled around by horse and carriage in the 1920s. Andy
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby dursleyglos » Tue May 24, 2011 9:49 pm

Dave - in your message on page 9 of this topic you mention a "Mr Tipper who lived in a red brick house next to the main house.... still going strong at the age of 96". Are you referring to Edward (Ted) Tipper? I've been speaking to Hugh Tipper (Ted's nephew) who confirms that Ted is the only surviving member of his father's family. He's not 96 though and I don't believe he was the gardener either.

Also, Hugh confirms that his grandfather (the Farm Bailiff) lived in the farm house situated close to the farm buildings in the Laggers and there were no other Tippers living in the grounds of Norman Hill. I'm not sure where the red brick house was exactly but if was next to the main house it seems it couldn't have been a Tipper who lived there.

Cheers

Andy
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby Keith McP » Thu Jul 07, 2011 6:04 pm

dursleyglos wrote:
> Welcome to the forum Keith and thanks for the additional family information which completes a few names and dates from what was discussed earlier.
> Have you done a lot of research into the Winterbotham family tree?
> Andy

Andy,

Yes I have, building on the Winterbotham family tree that has been around for a long time, I have almost completed sourcing/referencing all the UK, India, China and Australian Winterbothams who derive from Rev William Winterbotham and earlier.

Cheers
Keith
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby Rich Hughes » Fri Jul 29, 2011 9:59 am

On the bench opposite the Dursley Police Station there is a small plaque, and it reads "to the memory of Emily Page Hague (Emmi Winterbotham) who lived at Norman Hill House 1865-1932". Does anybody know what this is about? Is it to do with the Tragic accident she had at Sandpits? Also have all the benches that have been there been dedicated to her memory as the present bench is not that old?
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby butcherbot » Mon Oct 08, 2012 11:25 am

Rich Hughes wrote:
> A few, I thought I might find something that may be of interest. There was
> a mention that the Winterbothams built a large red brick house at Sandpits
> but I cannot find where I read that! I assume that's Norman Hill they mean.

The only red house I can recall was situated at the Dursley end of the 'Laggers farm house field' situated in the dip of the main road and 200 yds from the second driveway to Normanhill House- (this drive also allowed access to Harry Brown's Smithy which lay very close to the farm tractor and implement sheds) it belonged to Mr Barton The Milkman who delivered milk daily to Woodfields and environs. The house used to be covered with a red ivy and I think, in later years it was painted red too. I was born in The Laggers Farm House on March the 4th 1940. Fred Tipper was my Grampy. I spent most of the WW2 years on the farm.
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby Molly » Mon Apr 29, 2013 12:10 pm

Can't remember if I already commented on this post or not, sign of old-age! In the summer of 1963, Clive Bray and I, aged about 13, 'discovered' the old castle at the corner of the wall. We climbed over the wall and got permission (or so we thought) from Lurch the Gardener to use it as a private camp. We returned on a number of occasions and set it up as a sort of private den but one day got locked in there by an angry Lurch and had to escape out of a window, no easy feat! We even found an old car battery in there which we decided to 'borrow' and dragged it back to Summerhayes with a piece of rope. My Dad was outraged at the theft and made us take it back, which we eventually did. I'm sure this doesn't help any research but it was fun at the time. The 'Castle' was in fact just a stone turret and had two or three floors.

Chris Morrison, Basel, Switzerland
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby ken » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:47 pm

The gardener in question was my Grandfather, he stayed tending the grounds until they were sold off. He died 1965 aged 93. The nickname was a little unfair to him.
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby christopherwood » Tue Nov 18, 2014 11:56 am

Hi Pat
Re Norman Hill house, Cam I was one of the boys who used to swim in the tanks by the croft. I remember someone had cut the fence so we could get in as the gate was locked, but thinking back on it now it was very dangerous as there were pipes under the water so you had to be careful.
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby ken » Sat Dec 13, 2014 7:59 pm

My father's eldest brother attended Cam Hopton school, and he used to walk home to The Laggers up through the croft. One day he and a friend
decided to swin in the water tanks, his pal went home but Albert didn't. It was a little time before he was found. The rest of the family children then were sent to the Council school in Dursley "so that would not have to cross over water".

Ken
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Re: Norman Hill House, Cam

Postby martin » Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:03 pm

It has been very interesting to read the thread on Norman Hill House.I lived close by from 1959 and it was a much visited place.I was very upset when it was demolished and remember watching it come down.I knew Mr Browning and was sent by my Mother with food parcels regularly.He was a nice man and seemed abandoned living entirely on his own in what seemed an enormous place.
I remember the castle which had battlements, a flat roof with spiral staircase,and a fireplace in the main room.I think there was a tunnel and a causeway leading to it from the front of the house.The walled garden had trees and vegetables and there was a magnificent mulberry tree at the side of the house.
I don't remember much about the inside of the main house but I do remember the sale which took place of the contents. I still have the garden benches which my parents bought.There was a billiard room with a very ornate plaster ceiling.
Behind Mr Brownings house was a tennis court and the stones you mention were sort of very substantial gate posts.
Thanks a lot for all the reminders.
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